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Cure for HIV/AIDS: Research moves forwards for Once-Yearly HIV Treatment

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Cure for HIV AIDS Research moves forwards for Once-Yearly HIV Treatment

Cure for HIV-AIDS is getting closer each day and we are able to make the treatment easier with time. There is research going on currently for a new type of HIV medication which can be taken as infrequently as a year. The work is right now in very early stages and has been studied on lab animals, but it is going on with a steady progress rate.

The main goal is to create such an HIV drug that can be injected annually and protect HIV infected people. The once-yearly HIV treatment will also stop the transmission of disease and control the virus in people who already have it. It would be a great way and reduce the complexity of HIV treatment as patients will only have to take the injections once in a year.

HIV Patients will have to take Treatment once in a Year

HIV Patients will have to take Treatment once in a Year

The University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha researchers have already started with a drug called cabotegravir and it is currently under clinical trials. It will be an injection drug that is developed for both purposes for HIV prevention and treatment, which is designed for a dosage that has to be take once a month or two.

The researchers have chemically modified cabotegravir into a prodrug which when inserted into the body converts into an active form. The conversion will happen so slowly that the drugs will be fully released over a year in the lab animals. The research has been published in the Nature Materials journal on April 27 and is the start of something big in the direction to cure HIV and AIDS.

Clinical Trial and Future Research for Once-Yearly HIV Treatment

Clinical Trial and Future Research for Once-Yearly HIV Treatment

Dr. Howard Gendelman, heads of department of pharmacology and experimental neuroscience at the Nebraska center has said that we haven’t tested it in humans yet. Cabotegravir is a newer class of HIV drugs called integrase inhibitors developed by North Carolina-based ViiV Healthcare.

There are certain clinical trials underway which can lower the HIV infection rate by taking cabotegravir injection every eight weeks. The goal is to suppress HIV levels in the blood to such a low level that the drug treatment can be taken only once in a year.

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